By the very nature of its work and operations, the Museum of Genocide Victims represents a complex institution because it combines museological, archival, scientific-research, information, pedagogical and other activities.

One of its most important activities is the revision of the lists of the 1941-1945 war victims. The lists were originally made in 1964/65.

We have made the lists we have available to the public. We received praise, suggestions, objections and remarks. We consider them all as benevolent since they can all contribute to correcting any mistakes there may be.

In that regard, we have received a letter from Mr. Miodrag Gvozdenović from Belgrade. He sent a supplement to the list of victims with information about the fate of his close relatives. He said that he took time to review our list and that, during a conversation with his father, Bogdan (son od Ilija and Joka), they noted that their relatives were not included. In order to correct this deficiency, Mr. Gvozdenović sent the completed survey sheets. We have apologised for the oversight and corrected the mistake, as we did in similar situations in the past.

The list in PDF format that is visible on the site is almost impossible to change: it is a version made in 1992. If we would want to insert new data into it, it would mean changing the concept, the form, and other details. What is important is the change in our database because it is constantly updated and respresents the most complete and, to our knowledge, accurate list of war victims we have at our disposal.

In order to once again show that each letter is absolutely invaluable to us, below we provide the information that we received from Mr. Gvozdenović. We want to show how transparently the Museum operates and honour the people who help us in the search for the truth.

All the victims from Mr. Gvozdenović’s survey sheets areOrthodox Serbs.

1. Gvozdenović Joka,(née Babić), the child of father Đujan-Đuro and mother Janja, born in 1898 in the municipality of Vranjska, Bosanska Krupa. Joka was a housewife. In 1943, she died in a confinement in Grmeč, along with other refugees.

Data source: Son Bogdan found her dead body.

2. Babić Mile, the son of father Đujan-Đuro and mother Janja, born in 1915 (?) in Vranjska, Bosanska Krupa. Before the war, he worked as an official in the administration of Vrbas; he was killed by his fellow Partisans in Drvar in 1943 because he, allegedly, praised the English democratic system.

See more in: The Municipality of Bosanska Krupa in War and Revolution, Bosanska Krupa (1969)

3. Gvozdenović (Jovan) Mile, born in 1905 (?), Vranjska, Bosanska Krupa. Before the war, Mile was a farmer. He participated in the Uprising and died in 1942 as a member of the Partisan unit.

See the details of his suffering in:The Municipality of Bosanska Krupa in War and Revolution, Bosanska Krupa (1969)

4. Gvozdenović (Božo) Pejo, born in 1918 (?) in the municipality of Vranjska, Bosanska Krupa. Before the war, he was a farmer who then became the first commander in the Uprising. He died on November 4, 1942, in Cazin in the conflict between the Partisan and Ustashi-German units.

See the details of his suffering in:The Municipality of Bosanska Krupa in War and Revolution, Bosanska Krupa (1969)

5. Gvozdenović (Jovan) Ilija, born in 1898 in the municipality of Vranjska, Bosanska Krupa, was killed on July 28, 1941. Along with a few other Serbs, he was arrested at a market in Bosanska Krupa, killed and then buried in a mass grave at a location called Crno Jezero (The Black Lake).

Information on the arrest was given by son Bogdan, who was in the market in Bosanska Krupa on that faithful day, while Miloš Štrbac, one of the survivors, gave details on Ilija’s murder.

Ilija’s name was included on a memorial plaque near the Black Lake, which was later destroyed by the members of the Army of Bosnia and Herzegovina.

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